2012 « WLUFA

WLUFA Supports Elementary Teachers’ Federation of Ontario

December 20th, 2012

Bill C-377 passed Tuesday by the House of Commons

December 14th, 2012

Bill C-377 passed Tuesday by the House of Commons, unless it can be stopped in the Senate or through legal action, will require every labour organization [local, provincial and national] – whether unionized or not –to file the following detailed information annually.  This information will be posted by the Canada Revenue Agency on a public web site in a searchable format:

“(a) a set of financial statements for the fiscal period, in such form and containing such particulars and other information as may be prescribed relating to the financial position of the labour organization or labour trust, including
(i) a balance sheet showing the assets and liabilities of the labour organization or labour trust made up as of the last day of the fiscal period, and
(ii) a statement of income and expenditures of the labour organization or labour trust for the fiscal period;

(b) a set of statements for the fiscal period setting out the aggregate amount of all transactions and all disbursements — or book value in the case of investments and assets — with all transactions and all disbursements, the cumulative value of which in respect of a particular payer or payee for the period is greater than $5,000, shown as separate entries along with the name of the payer and payee and setting out for each of those transactions and disbursements its purpose and description and the specific amount that has been paid or received, or that is to be paid or received, and including

(i) a statement of accounts receivable,
(ii) a statement of loans exceeding $250 receivable from officers, employees, members or businesses
(iii) a statement showing the sale of investments and fixed assets including a description, cost, book value, and sale price,
(iv) a statement showing the purchase of investments and fixed assets including a description, cost, book value, and price paid,
(v) a statement of accounts payable,
(vi) a statement of loans payable,
(vii) a statement of disbursements to officers, directors and trustees, to employees with compensation over $100,000 and to persons in positions of authority who would reasonably be expected to have, in the ordinary course, access to material information about the business, operations, assets or revenue of the labour organization or labour trust, including gross salary, stipends, periodic payments, benefits (including pension obligations), vehicles, bonuses, gifts, service credits, lump sum payments, other forms of remuneration and, without limiting the generality of the foregoing, any other consideration provided,
(vii.1) a statement with a reasonable estimate of the percentage of time dedicated by persons referred to in subparagraph
(vii) to each of political activities, lobbying activities and other non-labour relations activities,
(viii) a statement with the aggregate amount of disbursements to employees and contractors including gross salary, stipends, periodic payments, benefits (including pension obligations), vehicles, bonuses, gifts, service credits, lump sum payments, other forms of remuneration and, without limiting the generality of the foregoing, any other consideration provided,
(viii.1) a statement with a reasonable estimate of the percentage of time dedicated by persons referred to in subparagraph (viii) to each of political activities, lobbying activities and other non-labour relations activities,
(ix) a statement with the aggregate amount of disbursements on labour relations activities,
(x) a statement of disbursements on polit­ical activities,
(xi) a statement of disbursements on lobbying activities,
(xii) a statement of contributions, gifts, and grants,
(xiii) a statement with the aggregate amount of disbursements on administration,
(xiv) a statement with the aggregate amount of disbursements on general overhead,
(xv) a statement with the aggregate amount of disbursements on organizing activities,
(xvi) statement with the aggregate amount of disbursements on collective bargaining activities,
(xvii) a statement of disbursements on conference and convention activities,
(xviii) a statement of disbursements on education and training activities,
(xix) a statement with the aggregate amount of disbursements on legal activities, excluding information protected by solicitor-client privilege,
(xix.1) a statement of disbursements (other than disbursements included in a statement referred to in any of subparagraphs (iv), (vii), (viii) and (ix) to (xix)) on all activities other than those that are primarily carried on for members of the labour organization or labour trust, excluding information protected by solicitor-client privilege, and any other prescribed statements;

(c) a statement for the fiscal period listing the sales of investments and fixed assets to, and the purchases of investments and fixed assets from, non-arm’s length parties, including for each property a description of the property and its cost, book value and sale price;

(d) a statement for the fiscal period listing all other transactions with non-arm’s length parties; and

(e) in the case of a labour organization or labour trust having its headquarters situated outside Canada, a statement in the prescribed form and containing such particulars as may be prescribed showing
(i) amounts paid or credited to the labour organization or labour trust in the fiscal period by, on behalf of or in respect of taxpayers resident in Canada, and
(ii) expenditures made by the labour organization or labour trust in the fiscal period inside or outside Canada and recorded separately in the accounts of the labour organization or labour trust as being directly related to its operations in Canada.”

There is no equivalent reporting requirement imposed on any other type of organizations in Canada – not private corporations, not public corporations, not non-profit corporations, not even charities. The anti-labour objective of the bill was apparent when the same Conservatives whose supported this bill, defeated an amendment that would have made the same reporting requirement obligatory for employer organizations.

Every effort will be made to defeat this bill in the Senate, and every legal angle for overturning it will be explored, should it pass the Senate too.  If it is enacted, the Canada Revenue Agency estimates that it would not be operable until 2014.

In the meantime, CAUT, along with many labour and non-labour organizations will be lobbying aggressively in the Senate. We will be advising you what your association can do to help.

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Canadian Association of University Teachers / Association canadienne des professeures et professeurs d’université / 2705 promenade Queensview Drive, Ottawa, (Ontario) K2B 8K2

James L. Turk, Executive Director / Directeur Général

tel: (613) 726-5176

fax/téléc: (613) 820-7244

mobile (613) 277-0488

turk@caut.ca

twitter: @jameslturk

Auditor General of Ontario 2012 Report

December 14th, 2012

Dear Colleagues:

On December 12 the Auditor General of Ontario tabled his 2012 Report.  It contained the results of the audit of university undergraduate teaching quality and resulted in five recommendations. OCUFA staff have had an opportunity to review the entire report, in particular the section (3.12) most pertinent to our members. The report can be accessed at http://www.auditor.on.ca/en/reports_2012_en.htm.

The text and recommendations are couched in language that is not sensationalist and encourages rather than prescribes. The recommendations are as follows:

·        More information from all faculty evaluations should be conveyed to students and administrators. Course evaluation information should be aggregated by university, faculty, and department so that best practices and areas needing further professional development can be identified. A common set of core questions for evaluations should be developed to assist in comparative analyses. Faculty should be given more constructive feedback on teaching;

·        There should be a specific emphasis on teaching quality in tenure and promotion processes in order to reflect the importance of teaching quality. All relevant information on teaching quality should be made available to committees. All documentation related to teaching quality should be retained for a certain period.

·        More professional development opportunities and more formal encouragement to participate in these opportunities should be instituted;

·        Universities should assess the impact of class size on teaching quality and study how to address the challenges posed by large classes, including weighing the impact of using teaching and sessional faculty and the extent to which they can best be used to address resource constraints;

·        The Ministry of Training, Colleges and Universities should provide more information on student outcomes and student satisfaction and consider meaningful measures for student learning outcomes.

For the most part, the section on university undergraduate teaching quality was relatively measured and not cause for great concern. That being said, the section was not entirely unproblematic. For example, the report failed to distinguish between data that refer to full-time faculty only and data that include contract academic staff – an oversight that can lead to errant conclusions about total (full-time and part-time) faculty numbers and average compensation. Similarly, references to collective agreements in the report were generally not positive and emphasized restrictions on access to faculty information.

In his media release accompanying the report the Auditor noted: “We found that Ontario universities generally had good processes to allow undergraduate students to evaluate their professors and courses. But the three universities we visited need to make better use of this good information to assess the overall quality of undergraduate teaching and should make more of this information available to students to help them in their course selection.”

We do not expect a great deal of media attention on section 3.12, given the more newsworthy aspects of some of the other audits contained in the report. Media attention, so far, has been focused on overspending at Metrolinx, untoward cost increases at the Crown Attorney’s office, the OPP, and Youth Justice Services, and the $1.4 billion uncollected taxes that may be written off by the provincial government at a time of relatively high deficits and anticipated program/service reductions. There may be some reaction from special interest groups and consultants (this is their bread and butter), as well as education reporters. A story ( http://www.thestar.com/news/canada/politics/article/1301230–auditor-general-s-report-ontario-slow-to-catch-tax-dodgers ) covering the Auditor’s Report in the December 13 print edition of the Toronto Star noted toward the end of the article that universities need to get more information on teaching quality to undergraduates so they know which courses to take (and, by implication, which to avoid). There was also an online-only story  ( http://www.theglobeandmail.com/news/national/education/poor-teaching-does-not-slow-promotion-ontario-auditor-general-finds/article6257861/ )at the Globe and Mail that focused specifically on section 3.12 and the need to use available tools for improving teaching quality better.  We will track coverage and respond as necessary.

I will keep you informed on any issues raised by the report. If you have questions or comments, please get back to me.

Best regards,

Mark

Mark Rosenfeld, Ph.D
Executive Director
Ontario Confederation of University Faculty Associations
83 Yonge Street, Suite 300
Toronto, Ontario, Canada M5C 1S8
Tel: 416-979-2117 x229
Fax: 416-593-5607
E-mail: mrosenfeld@ocufa.on.ca

WLUFA Advocate

December 14th, 2012

Dear Colleagues,

In our second issue, two of our colleagues, who were recipients of the OCUFA Teaching Awards this year, offer a synopsis of their approaches to teaching – I hope you find them as illuminating as I did.

We also have the first installment of a two-part feature on ‘bullying and incivility’ in the academy, and two of our regular columnists write on the onerous service workloads of faculty at Brantford and on the situation of contract faculty.

There are contributions on the withdrawal of the CAUT Censure over Balsillie School governance, Laurier’s financial statements, and the rhetorical tactics in debates around the IPRM.

As you know, this is only the second issue of our new regular newsletter, WLUFA advocate, which is part of the process of building our community through dialogue, discussion and debate. With this issue, we realized that we had more (in-depth) contributions than we could possibly include in one issue, but since we are committed to building our community, we are investigating ways of expanding our communications capabilities in the new year.

I want to thank all the contributors and the members of the Communications Committee and Larissa Brocklebank for getting our second issue of WLUFA advocate out to you. It is available online as a pdf, but the print copy will be in your letterbox shortly. When you are finished with the print copy, please pass it on to other members of the university community.

On behalf of the Communications Committee, I wish you a relaxing break and a happy holidays!!

Herbert Pimlott

 

House of Commons narrowed passed anti-labour Bill C-377

December 13th, 2012

Greetings (sadly),

The House of Commons narrowed passed anti-labour Bill C-377 this evening by a 147-135 margin. The Bill now goes to the Senate.

The Bill amends the Income Tax Act of Canada to require all labour organizations (including unions, associations, and federations) to file 29 schedules of financial information with the Federal Minister of National Revenue, who is then required to post them online for all Canadians to access, searchable by key word. The Bill imposes financial disclosure requirements on labour organizations and associations (union and  non-union) far greater than those required of any other organization in Canada. Not even the government itself is required to provide this level of disclosure. The cost of compliance will be very substantial for every local association, as well as every regional, provincial and national federation of labour associations and unions.

Government auditing costs will also be substantial. The Government estimated it will cost the Government of Canada $2 million to administer in the first two years, and then $800,000 after that — for 1,000 reports. The Parliamentary Budget Officer in his assessment said there would be 18,000 organizations affected.

No other jurisdiction in North America has reporting legislation this punitive.

The Bill passed despite months of aggressive lobbying by the Canadian labour movement and despite strong opposition from the opposition parties and even some Conservative MPs.  But the Prime Minister’s Office aggressively promoted this private member’s bill.

CAUT has been working with the Canadian Labour Congress, supported by other organizations, including the Canadian Bar Association. Attention will be turned to trying to stop the bill in the Senate and considering legal options.

More details to follow tomorrow.

Jim

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Canadian Association of University Teachers / Association canadienne des professeures et professeurs d’université / 2705 promenade Queensview Drive, Ottawa, (Ontario) K2B 8K2

James L. Turk, Executive Director / Directeur Général

tel: (613) 726-5176

fax/téléc: (613) 820-7244

mobile (613) 277-0488

turk@caut.ca

twitter: @jameslturk

Canadian Association of University Teachers launches Canada’s Past Matters campaign

November 22nd, 2012

For immediate release

 

Canadian Association of University Teachers launches Canada’s Past Matters campaign

 

(Ottawa: November 22, 2012) The Canadian Association of University Teachers (CAUT) has unveiled a national campaign exposing the threats to Canada’s cultural institutions and historic sites and proposing what must be done to reverse the damage.

The “Canada’s Past Matters” campaign will highlight how federal funding cuts and policy changes are putting the survival of libraries, archives, museums and historical sites across the country at risk.

“Our ability as Canadians to know, understand and appreciate our past is at stake because of the federal government’s short-sighted cuts and ill-advised changes to historical programs and services,” CAUT executive director James L. Turk said at a news conference in Ottawa today.

“We’ve launched this campaign because the changes we’re seeing affect not just our members, but all Canadians in very damaging ways,” added Turk. “We cannot chart our future properly unless we know and understand our past. Until government policy is changed, that will be less and less possible for our children and future generations.”

Turk said the five aspects of the campaign are:

  • Save Library & Archives Canada: The federal institution responsible for preserving Canada’s history and cultural heritage is seriously threatened by major budget cuts, service reductions, and a narrowing of its mandate.
  • Preserve Canada’s Historical Sites:  A $29 million reduction in the budget for Parks Canada is threatening the future of Canada’s 167 historic and archaeological sites.
  • Protect Canada’s Public Libraries: The inter-library loan program between Library & Archives Canada and regional public libraries is being eliminated along with public internet access in local libraries, making it more difficult for Canadians to access information and knowledge.
  • Restore Canada’s Local Archives: The elimination of the National Archival Development Program has put at risk regional archives and their projects across Canada.
  • Retain the Canadian Museum of Civilization: The government plans to end Canada’s largest and most popular museum – the only museum committed to promoting knowledge and critical understanding of, and appreciation and respect for, human cultural achievements and human behaviour.

For more information about the “Canada’s Past Matters” campaign, visit www.canadaspastmatters.ca.

The Canadian Association of University Teachers is the national voice of more than 68,000 academic and general staff at 120 universities and colleges across the country.

Contact:

Angela Regnier, Communications Officer, 613-726-5186 (o);  613-601-6304 (cell);

regnier@caut.ca (email)

CAUT Statement for the National Day of Remembrance and Action on Violence Against Women on December 6th

November 20th, 2012

November 15, 2012

M E M O R A N D U M   12:44

 

TO:                 Presidents and Administrative Officers – Local, Federated and Provincial Associations

FROM:            James L. Turk, Executive Director

 

RE:                  CAUT Statement for the National Day of Remembrance and Action on Violence Against Women on December 6th

 

In recognition of the fourteen women murdered at L’Ecole Polytechnique in Montreal in 1989, December 6 is the National Day of Remembrance and Action on Violence Against Women.

This year, CAUT’s statement will be published in the Bulletin and on our websitein advance of December 6. Attached is a copy of the statement which is in the form of a poster that you can print, circulate to your members and display.

We encourage member associations to issue their own statement for the National Day of Remembrance and Action on Violence Against Women and to participate in and support campus and community events that seek to end violence.

If your association issues a statement or participates in activities, please let us know.  If you have any questions, require assistance or would like to share information about the events happening locally on your campus or in your community, please do not hesitate to contact Linda Rumleski (rumleski@caut.ca or 613.820.2270 x.178).

OCUFA’s 2012 Lorimer Award Nominations

November 6th, 2012

Dear Colleagues:

Nominations are now open for OCUFA’s  2012 Lorimer Award. This award recognizes outstanding contributions to improving the terms and conditions of employment of Ontario university faculty through bargaining. It was created by OCUFA in 2009 in honor of Doug and Joyce Lorimer.

Attached to this email, please find a promotional flyer you can print and share with your Association. Additional information, nomination forms and guidelines can be found at http://ocufa.on.ca/ocufa-awards/ The nomination deadline is December 10, 2012.

The 2012 Lorimer Award will be presented at the February 8, 2013  Lorimer and Status of Women Awards Dinner at the Westin Habour Castle Hotel in Toronto.

If you have any questions, please do not hesitate to contact me.

 

Best regards,
Mark
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Mark Rosenfeld, Ph.D
Executive Director
Ontario Confederation of University Faculty Associations
83 Yonge Street, Suite 300
Toronto, Ontario, Canada M5C 1S8
Tel: 416-979-2117 x229
Fax: 416-593-5607
E-mail: mrosenfeld@ocufa.on.ca

 

Kids’ Festive Party!

November 6th, 2012

WLUFA End-of-Fall Term Dinner & Dance Party!

October 30th, 2012