2014 « WLUFA

Copyright literacy

October 29th, 2014

Greetings,

You are invited to participate in an research study about levels of copyright literacy among Canadian university faculty members. The study is being conducted by Lisa Di Valentino, Ph.D. candidate, Faculty of Information and Media Studies, University of Western Ontario.

Individuals who teach university-level (undergraduate or graduate) courses and who are responsible for assigning readings and other materials to students in a course are eligible to participate in this study. Both full-time and limited-duty faculty are included. The survey is in English.

The purpose of this survey is to study faculty awareness with regard to Canadian copyright law and how it affects their ability to teach, their perception of who is primarily responsible for ensuring adherence to the law, and their own practices related to copyright compliance.

Insights gained from the survey will be used in a larger project aiming to develop best practices for copyright compliance management in colleges and universities.

If you agree to participate, you will be asked to complete an online survey comprising 20 or fewer questions. It is anticipated that the entire task will take approximately 10-15 minutes to complete. All data collected will remain confidential and accessible only to the investigators of this study.

There are no known or anticipated risks or discomforts associated with participating in this study. You will not be compensated for your participation in this research.

Participation in this survey is voluntary. Completion of the survey is indication of your consent to participate in this study. You may refuse to participate or withdraw from the survey at any time by closing the browser window.

The principal investigator for this project is Dr. Samuel E. Trosow 519-661-2111 x88498, e-mail: strosow@uwo.ca.

If you have any questions about the content or purpose of the survey, you may contact Lisa Di Valentino 519-615-9126, email: ldivalen@uwo.ca.

If you have any questions about your rights as a research participant or the conduct of this study, you may contact The Office of Research Ethics 519-661-3036, email: ethics@uwo.ca.

To participate, please click the following link, or copy and paste into your browser: http://surveys.fims.uwo.ca/surveys/Surveys/TakeSurvey.aspx?surveyid=1097

The survey will be open until November 12, 2014, 11:59pm EST.

Thank you,


Lisa Di Valentino, MA, MLIS, JD
PhD candidate, Library and Information Science
The University of Western Ontario
ldivalen@uwo.ca

Focus on Contract Faculty, Issue 2

October 9th, 2014

focus on Contract Faculty Issue 2 October 2014

MEDIA ALERT – Precarious faculty issue highlighted on The Agenda

October 9th, 2014

Hello all;

 

Last night, TVO’s The Agenda broadcast a segment on the rise of precarious work, featuring Western and Laurier prof Kane Faucher.

 

The segment can be viewed at: http://tvo.org/video/207366/new-work-reality

OCUFA’s post is available at: http://ocufa.on.ca/blog-posts/faculty/challenges-of-precarious-academic-work-featured-on-the-agenda/

Our Tweet is at: https://twitter.com/OCUFA/status/519481198314541056

Our Facebook post is at: https://www.facebook.com/OCUFA/posts/767500743307045

 

Best Regards,

Graeme

 

Graeme Stewart

Communications Manager

Ontario Confederation of University Faculty Associations

17 Isabella Street | Toronto, ON | M4Y 1M7
416 979 2117 x232 | gstewart@ocufa.on.ca
www.ocufa.on.ca | @OCUFA | www.facebook.com/OCUFA

 

Subscribe to the OCUFA Report

MEDIA ALERT – Precarious faculty issue highlighted on The Agenda

October 9th, 2014

Hello all;

 

Last night, TVO’s The Agenda broadcast a segment on the rise of precarious work, featuring Western and Laurier prof Kane Faucher.

 

The segment can be viewed at: http://tvo.org/video/207366/new-work-reality

OCUFA’s post is available at: http://ocufa.on.ca/blog-posts/faculty/challenges-of-precarious-academic-work-featured-on-the-agenda/

Our Tweet is at: https://twitter.com/OCUFA/status/519481198314541056

Our Facebook post is at: https://www.facebook.com/OCUFA/posts/767500743307045

 

Best Regards,

Graeme

 

Graeme Stewart

Communications Manager

Ontario Confederation of University Faculty Associations

17 Isabella Street | Toronto, ON | M4Y 1M7
416 979 2117 x232 | gstewart@ocufa.on.ca
www.ocufa.on.ca | @OCUFA | www.facebook.com/OCUFA

 

Subscribe to the OCUFA Report

Nominations for OCUFA’s 2014 Lorimer Distinguished Service Award for Bargaining – deadline December 15, 2014

October 2nd, 2014

Dear Colleagues:

 

Nominations are now open for OCUFA’s  2014 Lorimer Award. This award recognizes outstanding contributions to improving the terms and conditions of employment of Ontario university faculty through bargaining. It was created by OCUFA in 2009 in honor of Doug and Joyce Lorimer.

Attached to this email, please find promotional flyers in English and French which you can print and share with your Association. Additional information, nomination forms and guidelines can be found at http://ocufa.on.ca/ocufa-awards/ The nomination deadline is December 15, 2014.

The 2014 Lorimer Award will be presented at the February 7, 2014  Lorimer and Status of Women Awards lunch at the Westin Habour Castle Hotel in Toronto.

If you have any questions, please do not hesitate to contact me.

Best regards,
Mark

——————————————————–
Mark Rosenfeld, Ph.D
Executive Director
Ontario Confederation of University Faculty Associations
17 Isabella Street
Toronto, Ontario, Canada M4Y 1M7
Tel: 416-979-2117 x229
Fax: 416-593-5607
E-mail: mrosenfeld@ocufa.on.ca
Web: www.ocufa.on.ca
www.academicmatters.ca
www.weteachontario.ca
Subscribe to the OCUFA Report

 

WLUFA Advocate 3.1

September 30th, 2014
WLUFA Advocate 3.1_Page_1WLUFA Advocate 3.1_Page_2WLUFA Advocate 3.1_Page_3WLUFA Advocate 3.1_Page_4WLUFA Advocate 3.1_Page_5WLUFA Advocate 3.1_Page_6WLUFA Advocate 3.1_Page_7WLUFA Advocate 3.1_Page_8

IMPORTANT ARBITRATION DECISION AT BROCK / IMPORTANTE DÉCISION ARBITRALE À L’UNIVERSITÉ BROCK

September 23rd, 2014

 

** La version française suit. Ce courriel est envoyé au nom de David Robinson. La version PDF de la note, en français et en anglais, est jointe au présent message.**

 

This email is being sent on behalf of David Robinson. The PDFs of this memo, both English and French versions, are attached to this message.

 

—————————————————————————————–

September 15, 2014

 

 

MEMORANDUM   14:29

 

TO:             Presidents and Administrative Officers

Local, Federated and Provincial Associations

 

FROM:        David Robinson, Executive Director

 

RE:              Important Arbitration Decision at Brock

 

 

 

 

Greetings,

 

I am writing to advise you of an important arbitration award issued recently by Arbitrator Paula Knopf in relation to a grievance filed by the Brock University Faculty Association (BUFA). The award demonstrates the importance of negotiating good collective agreement language that limits the scope of management rights. It also underscores the need for academic staff associations to be vigilant in protecting such good language and ensuring that employers do not succeed in negotiating management rights terms that may limit your ability to rely upon the reasoning used by Arbitrator Knopf in the Brock award.

 

After the award was issued, Brock University filed an application for judicial review, seeking to overturn the decision in court.  We have recently been informed that the University has withdrawn that application, so the decision and its reasoning stand unchallenged.

 

The case considered whether the employer had an obligation to provide legal assistance to a faculty member brought before the Ontario Human Rights Tribunal as a result of a complaint in relation to her work at the University. The Arbitrator found that the collective agreement language did not require Brock to satisfy BUFA’s claim for insurance coverage of legal costs for the faculty member. This aspect of the decision is disappointing.

 

However, the Arbitrator also noted that the management’s rights clause in the Collective Agreement (Article 3.01) obligates the University to exercise its management’s rights “reasonably and fairly.”  She found that when it rejected the faculty member’s request for legal assistance, the University failed to exercise its rights reasonably and fairly and, therefore, violated the collective agreement.

 

This aspect of her award is important because the Arbitrator looked to the management’s rights clause to conclude that had the administration properly investigated the faculty member’s claim, it would have discovered the actions of the faculty member, which led to the complaints, occurred at the request of an Associate Dean and that the complaints against her were weak (as evidenced by the fact that it was summarily dismissed).  In these circumstances, the Employer should have paid for the faculty member’s legal counsel as part of its obligation to exercise its management’s rights in a fair and reasonable manner.

 

With collective agreement language that requires management to exercise its rights in a fair and reasonable manner, other academic staff associations may be able to use the award to establish rights where other provisions of the collective agreement do not have sufficiently clear or strong language.

 

We encourage you to review your collective agreement’s management’s rights clause. Ideally, it should simply and only say:

 

“The employer shall exercise its management functions in a manner that is fair, reasonable, and equitable.”

 

If you have any questions about this matter, please let me know.

 

The Knopf award is available on the CanLII website:  http://www.canlii.org/en/on/onla/doc/2014/2014canlii24449/2014canlii24449.html?searchUrlHash=AAAAAQALa25vcGYgYnJvY2sAAAAAAQ

 

 

Le 15 septembre 2014

 

 

NOTE 14:29

 

Destinataires :    Présidents et agents administratifs

Associations locales, fédérées et provinciales

 

Expéditeur :        David Robinson, directeur général

 

Objet :             Importante décision arbitrale à l’Université Brock

 

 

 

Bonjour,

 

Je veux, dans la présente note, vous faire part d’une importante sentence rendue récemment par l’arbitre Paula Knopf dans le cadre d’un grief déposé par l’association de personnel académique de l’Université Brock (BUFA). La décision montre la nécessité de négocier, au titre des conventions collectives, des dispositions solides qui encadrent les fonctions administratives de l’employeur. Elle souligne également la vigilance dont doivent faire preuve les associations de personnel académique afin de protéger ces dispositions et d’éviter que les employeurs puissent négocier des modalités quant à leurs fonctions administratives qui restreignent la capacité des associations à s’appuyer sur le raisonnement suivi par l’arbitre Paula Knopf dans sa décision à l’Université Brock.

 

Après avoir pris connaissance de la sentence, l’Université Brock a déposé une requête en révision judiciaire aux fins de son annulation. Nous avons récemment appris que l’Université avait retiré sa requête, de sorte que la décision et ses motifs ne sont plus contestés.

 

La question était de savoir si l’employeur avait l’obligation de fournir de l’aide juridique à une membre du corps professoral traduit devant le Tribunal des droits de la personne de l’Ontario par suite d’une plainte relative à son travail à l’Université. L’arbitre a conclu qu’en fonction des dispositions de la convention collective, l’Université Brock n’était pas tenue d’accéder à la demande de la BUFA relativement à la prise en charge par l’assurance des frais juridiques de la membre du corps professoral. Cet aspect de la décision est décevant.

 

Toutefois, l’arbitre a également conclu qu’aux termes de la clause de la convention collective sur les fonctions administratives de l’employeur (article 3.01), l’Université devait exercer ses fonctions « raisonnablement et équitablement ». Selon l’arbitre, l’Université n’a pas exercé ses fonctions administratives raisonnablement et équitablement quand elle a rejeté la demande d’aide juridique de la membre du corps professoral et a, par conséquent, violé la convention collective.

 

Cet aspect de la sentence revêt une grande importance. En effet, l’arbitre a conclu, à l’examen de la clause sur les fonctions administratives de l’employeur, que si la direction avait étudié adéquatement la demande de la membre du corps professoral elle aurait découvert que les actions qui lui étaient reprochées et à l’origine de la plainte avaient eu lieu à la demande d’un doyen associé et que les arguments sur lesquels reposait la plainte étaient faibles (comme en témoigne le fait qu’elle ait été rejetée de façon sommaire). Dans ces circonstances, l’employeur aurait dû assumer les frais juridiques de la membre au titre de son obligation à exercer ses fonctions administratives de façon raisonnable et équitable.

 

Les associations de personnel académique qui, dans leur convention collective, ont une disposition qui exige l’exercice des fonctions administratives de l’employeur d’une façon raisonnable et équitable pourraient être en mesure d’invoquer cette décision pour établir des droits en l’absence d’autres dispositions suffisamment claires et solides.

 

Nous vous invitons à relire la clause sur les fonctions administratives de l’employeur qui figure dans votre convention collective. Elle devrait purement et simplement stipuler :

 

« L’employeur exerce ses fonctions administratives de façon juste, raisonnable et équitable. »

 

N’hésitez pas à communiquer avec moi si vous avez des questions à ce sujet.

 

La sentence rendue par l’arbitre Paula Knopf est accessible sur le site Web CanLII : http://www.canlii.org/en/on/onla/doc/2014/2014canlii24449/2014canlii24449.html?searchUrlHash=AAAAAQALa25vcGYgYnJvY2sAAAAAAQ

 

 

STUDENT LEARNING OUTCOMES / LES ACQUIS D’APPRENTISSAGE DES ÉTUDIANTS

September 23rd, 2014

 

** La version française suit. Ce courriel est envoyé au nom de David Robinson. La version PDF de la note, en français et en anglais, est jointe au présent message. **

 

This email is being sent on behalf of David Robinson. The PDFs of this memo, both English and French versions, are attached to this message.

 

—————————————————————————————–

 

September 17, 2014

 

 

MEMORANDUM   14:28

 

TO:             Presidents and Administrative Officers

Local, Federated and Provincial Associations

 

FROM:        David Robinson, Executive Director

 

RE:              Student Learning Outcomes

 

 

 

 

Several universities and colleges in Canada, along with some provincial governments, have embraced various forms of defining and measuring “student learning outcomes” in recent years. While the idea of learning outcomes has its roots in educational and pedagogical theory, the concept is increasingly being taken up by institutions, governments, testing agencies and international bodies such as the OECD as a way to develop new measures, no matter how flawed, to assess the efficacy and performance of systems, programs and potentially individual faculty.

 

In the post-secondary education context, learning outcomes refer generally to the core competencies and abilities that students should be expected to demonstrate at the completion of a course or a program. These outcomes are defined in various ways by different institutions, ranging from vague generalities to more substantive and specific outcomes.

 

In some cases, learning outcomes are being adopted in Canada with respect to accreditation requirements. Simon Fraser University and Thompson Rivers University, for example, have both developed learning outcomes largely in response to meeting the requirements for accreditation with the North West Commission on Colleges and Universities (NWCCU). In both cases, the faculty associations have raised a number of objections about learning outcomes generally, including the following:

 

  • Learning outcomes undervalue the learning process by focusing solely on outputs. While the ends are important, the means also matter.
  • The development of standardized learning outcomes threatens the autonomy and academic freedom of faculty by imposing targets or pre-determined learning objectives.
  • Learning outcomes represent another bureaucratic and workload burden on faculty.
  • Learning outcomes focus on the short-term rather than the long-term benefits of a college or university education.
  • The development of pre-determined learning outcomes runs counter to the educational mission of universities and colleges. Post-secondary education should not seek to meet rigid objectives, but rather advance knowledge by exposing students to intellectual uncertainty, ambiguity and experimentation.
  • While most learning outcomes at the institutional level in Canada have been to date largely descriptive and qualitative in nature, there is pressure mounting to develop ways of quantitatively measuring these outcomes. Other jurisdictions have had some experience with this. In the United States, the Collegiate Learning Assessment (CLA) and Community College Learning Assessment (CCLA) were developed by the Lumina Foundation and the Council for Aid to Education to identify the value added from a college or university education. To do so, the tools test students on generic skills both at the beginning and the end of a degree/diploma program. The CLA and CCLA are being tested by the Higher Education Quality Council of Ontario to determine if the results are valid in the provincial context.

At the international level, the OECD’s Assessment of Higher Education Learning Outcomes (AHELO) is intended to measure what final-year university students “know and are able to do” in terms of both generic skills and discipline-specific skills. While the future of AHELO is in doubt, Ontario has participated in the feasibility phase of the project.

 

The quantification of student learning outcomes through standardized tests like the CLA, CCLA and AHELO instruments clearly raises a number of methodological and implementation problems. However, the more serious challenges as our colleagues in the K-12 system well know are political. Various attempts to “measure” and “assess” appropriate “student learning outcomes” have had a deleterious impact on public education in the United States in particular. They have encouraged the growth of simplistic standardized and high stakes tests used to punish and reward schools and teachers. Already, they have begun to infect American universities and colleges.

 

Assessment is of course central to teaching and learning, and evaluating students is part of what academic staff have always been doing. Whether testing their students’ grasp of certain facts and information, evaluating the logic of arguments, or challenging pre-conceived opinions and biases, academic staff use their professional judgment to evaluate a student’s performance in a class. Learning outcomes measurements imply that this professional judgment is not enough. Instead, teachers in colleges and universities are being asked to use measurements that essentially reduce student learning to quantifiable standards. It is not a far stretch to see how the results of these assessments could be used, and most certainly abused, to evaluate the “effectiveness” of teaching and learning at the institutional, departmental and individual instructor level.

 

I would encourage associations to monitor the development of learning outcomes at your institution and to engage with your members on the issue. I would also encourage you to resist the introduction of versions of learning outcomes, such as quantifiable measures like the CLA, which could have significant implications for the work and professional autonomy of academic staff.  Finally, please share with me any information you have about the impact of learning outcomes for your members.

 

Do not hesitate to contact me if you have questions or require further clarification.

 

____________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________

 

Le 17 septembre 2014

 

 

NOTE 14:28

 

DESTINATAIRES :        Présidents et agents administratifs

Associations locales, fédérées et provinciales

 

EXPÉDITEUR :               David Robinson, directeur général

 

OBJET :                          Les acquis d’apprentissage des étudiants

 

 

 

 

Plusieurs universités et collèges du Canada, de concert avec certains gouvernements provinciaux, ont adopté depuis quelques années une variété de notions et de formes de mesure des « acquis d’apprentissage des étudiants ». En outre, des établissements, des gouvernements, des organismes d’évaluation et des organes internationaux comme l’OCDE font de plus en plus appel à la notion d’acquis d’apprentissage, bien qu’elle relève de la théorie de l’éducation et de la pédagogie, pour l’élaboration de nouvelles mesures fort discutables d’évaluation de l’efficacité et de la performance des systèmes, des programmes et, potentiellement, des membres du corps professoral.

 

Dans le contexte de l’éducation postsecondaire, la notion d’acquis d’apprentissage a généralement trait aux compétences et aux capacités que l’étudiant devrait avoir acquises à la fin d’un cours ou d’un programme. La définition de ces acquis varie d’un établissement à l’autre, allant d’une formulation vague et générale à un énoncé étoffé et précis.

 

L’adoption d’acquis d’apprentissage au Canada relève dans certains cas du respect de normes d’agrément. L’Université Simon-Fraser et l’Université Thompson Rivers, par exemple, ont toutes les deux établi des acquis d’apprentissage largement en réponse aux exigences de leur agrément auprès de la North West Commission on Colleges and Universities (NWCCU). Dans les deux cas, les associations de personnel académique ont formulé de nombreuses objections par rapport aux acquis d’apprentissage en général, entre autres :

 

  • Les acquis d’apprentissage sous-estiment le processus d’apprentissage en ne mettant l’accent que sur les résultats. Les résultats d’apprentissage sont bel et bien importants, mais le processus d’enseignement l’est tout autant.
  • La normalisation des acquis d’apprentissage, à savoir l’imposition de cibles et d’objectifs d’apprentissage prédéterminés, porte atteinte à l’autonomie et à la liberté académique du corps professoral.
  • Les acquis d’apprentissage constituent un nouveau fardeau administratif qui alourdit la charge de travail du corps professoral.
  • Les acquis d’apprentissage privilégient les avantages à court terme plutôt qu’à long terme d’une éducation collégiale ou universitaire.
  • L’établissement d’acquis d’apprentissage prédéterminés s’oppose à la mission éducative des universités et des collèges. L’éducation postsecondaire ne doit pas viser la réalisation d’objectifs rigides, mais bien l’avancement des connaissances en exposant les étudiants à l’incertitude intellectuelle, l’ambiguïté et l’expérimentation.
  • Bien que la plupart des acquis d’apprentissage définis par des établissements canadiens jusqu’ici soient largement de nature descriptive et qualitative, des pressions croissantes se font sentir pour la création d’outils de mesure quantitative de ces acquis. Cette démarche a gagné d’autres pays. Aux États-Unis, par exemple, la Lumina Foundation et le Council for Aid to Education ont créé des outils d’évaluation – Collegiate Learning Assessment (CLA) et Community College Learning Assessment (CCLA) – de la valeur ajoutée d’une éducation collégiale ou universitaire. Ces outils sont utilisés pour évaluer les compétences générales des étudiants au début et à la fin d’un cycle d’études. Le Conseil ontarien de la qualité de l’enseignement supérieur procède actuellement à l’essai de ces outils pour en évaluer la validité dans le contexte ontarien.

À l’échelle internationale, l’OCDE a établi l’Assessment of Higher Education Learning Outcomes (AHELO) qui vise à mesurer ce que l’étudiant universitaire « sait et est capable de faire » au terme de ses études, tant sur le plan de ses compétences générales que de ses compétences spécifiques. Bien que l’avenir de l’AHELO soit incertain, l’Ontario n’en a pas moins participé à une étude de faisabilité du projet.

 

L’évaluation quantitative des acquis d’apprentissage des étudiants au moyen de tests normalisés comme le CLA, le CCLA et l’AHELO pose manifestement des problèmes sur les plans de la méthode et de l’application pratique. Cependant, comme le savent très bien nos collègues du primaire et du secondaire, les plus importants défis sont d’ordre politique. Divers essais de « mesure » et « d’évaluation » adéquates des « acquis d’apprentissage des élèves » ont eu des effets néfastes sur l’éducation publique, plus particulièrement aux États-Unis. Ils ont favorisé l’usage répandu de tests simplistes standardisés aux enjeux très élevés aux fins de pénaliser ou de récompenser les écoles et le personnel enseignant. Et ils ont déjà commencé à contaminer des universités et collèges américains.

 

L’évaluation est bien sûr au cœur des démarches d’enseignement et d’apprentissage, et l’évaluation des étudiants fait depuis toujours partie intégrante du travail du personnel académique. Qu’ils vérifient la connaissance de certains faits, évaluent la logique d’arguments ou mettent en question des opinions ou des préjugés, les membres du personnel académique utilisent leur jugement professionnel pour évaluer le rendement des étudiants. La nécessité de mesurer les acquis d’apprentissage laisse supposer que ce jugement professionnel ne suffit pas à la tâche. On demande plutôt au personnel enseignant des collèges et universités d’avoir recours à des mesures qui réduisent ni plus ni moins l’apprentissage des étudiants à des normes quantifiables. N’est pas loin le jour où les résultats de ces évaluations seront employés, et certes abusivement, pour évaluer « l’efficacité » de l’enseignement et de l’apprentissage à l’échelle de l’établissement, du département et de l’individu.

 

J’incite les associations à surveiller la mise en place d’acquis d’apprentissage au sein de leur établissement et de sensibiliser leurs membres à cet égard. Je vous encourage aussi à vous opposer à l’implantation de versions des acquis d’apprentissage, par exemple des mesures quantifiables comme le CLA, qui pourraient avoir des répercussions majeures sur le travail et l’autonomie professionnelle du personnel académique. Enfin, je vous demande de bien vouloir me faire part de toute information concernant les effets des acquis d’apprentissage sur vos membres.

 

N’hésitez pas à communiquer avec moi si vous avez des questions ou souhaitez obtenir des précisions à ce sujet.

 

 

IPRM

September 19th, 2014
Letter to Board Of Governors from WLUFA President, dated Sept 12 2014

 

 

 

 

 

MEDIA ALERT – CBC Sunday Edition documentary on Precarious Faculty

September 9th, 2014

Hi all;

 

As you may know, CBC’s Sunday Edition played a radio documentary this weekend examining the issue of precarious academic work. It’s a challenging and important piece, and something you may wish to share with your networks.

 

The documentary can be found at:  http://www.cbc.ca/thesundayedition/documentaries/2014/09/07/class-struggle/

 

There is also some text on the OCUFA site that, with some minor revisions, can be re-purposed for your own websites. Please feel free to copy and edit as needed: http://ocufa.on.ca/blog-posts/faculty/tune-in-sunday-to-a-cbc-radio-documentary-on-precarious-faculty/

 

Sue Ferguson, from WLUFA, has asked people to consider leaving a message of support in the comments section of the CBC page, which can be accessed at the link above.

 

Thanks,

Graeme

 

Graeme Stewart

Communications Manager

Ontario Confederation of University Faculty Associations

17 Isabella Street | Toronto, ON | M4Y 1M7
416 979 2117 x232 | gstewart@ocufa.on.ca
www.ocufa.on.ca | @OCUFA | www.facebook.com/OCUFA

 

Subscribe to the OCUFA Report